Archive for the ‘Biting’ Category

Bedbugs With Drug-Resistant MRSA ‘Superbug’ Germ Found

ATLANTA — Hate insects? Afraid of germs? Researchers are reporting an alarming combination: bedbugs carrying a staph “superbug.” Canadian scientists detected drug-resistant staph bacteria in bedbugs from three hospital patients from a downtrodden Vancouver neighborhood.

Bedbugs Superbugs

Bedbugs have not been known to spread disease, and there’s no clear evidence that the five bedbugs found on the patients or their belongings had spread the MRSA germ they were carrying or a second less dangerous drug-resistant bacteria.

However, bedbugs can cause itching that can lead to excessive scratching. That can cause breaks in the skin that make people more susceptible to these germs, noted Dr. Marc Romney, one of the study’s authors.

The study is small and very preliminary. “But it’s an intriguing finding” that needs to be further researched, said Romney, medical microbiologist at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver.

The hospital is the closest one to the poor Downtown Eastside neighborhood near the city’s waterfront. Romney said he and his colleagues did the research after seeing a simultaneous boom in bedbugs and MRSA cases from the neighborhood.

Five bedbugs were crushed and analyzed. MRSA, or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, was found on three bugs. MRSA is resistant to several types of common antibiotics and can become deadly if it gets through the skin and into the bloodstream.

Two bugs had VRE, or vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, a less dangerous form of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

Both germs are often seen in hospitals, and experts have been far more worried about nurses and other health care workers spreading the bacteria than insects.

It’s not clear if the bacteria originated with the bedbugs or if the bugs picked it up from already infected people, Romney added.

The study was released Wednesday by Emerging Infectious Diseases, a publication of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

TICKS that don’t tock

Ticks…what can I say…I hate them. They are nasty little creatures and I do not know of one well seeded bugman that does not roll his eyes at the mere mention of the word….. “TICK” (BTW, I just rolled my eyes).

We responded to a tick problem from a new customer and much to our dismay, the event was a normal tick job…nasty. Not nasty as if the home was dirty, actually the home was immaculate in appearance. When I say “nasty”, it is in reference to the fact that we felt imaginary ticks crawling on us during the whole treatment. If you are an experienced pest control operator, you instantly understand what I am speaking about. This happens quite often when treating for ticks and bedbugs.

Our somatosensory system becomes superhuman and even the slightest dermal sensation is perceived as if a horde of ravenous ticks are attempting to attack us with their blood sucking parasitical bite.

Our inspection revealed that the heaviest concentrations were in the areas of where the family dog slept. The crate and the owners bed.

 Yes, the dark spots that you see on the mattress are ticks.

After ticks feed on the host, it is normal for the ticks to climb upwards and deposit their eggs.  Here is a photo of an infested curtain. 

Here is a photo of the ticks that were removed from the customers bed once the fitted sheets were removed, the customer was never bothered by ticks.

Do you see the small dot on the side of the plastic cup, below is the same picture enlarged.

The tick larva stage is very small and can hide practically anywhere.

LIFE CYCLE

Ticks have four developmental stages: egg, six-legged larva, one or more eight-legged nymphs and adult. Hard ticks usually mate on the host animal. The female then drops to the ground and deposits from 3,000 to 6,000 eggs, which hatch into larvae or “seed ticks.” Larvae climb nearby vegetation where they collect in large numbers while waiting for small rodents or other vertebrates to pass within reach. After a blood meal on the host, the engorged larvae drop to the ground. shed their skins (molt) and emerge as nymphs. Like larvae, the nymphs await the passage of a host, engorge themselves with blood, drop to the ground, molt and become adults. Adult ticks seek host animals and after engorgement, mate.

Male hard ticks usually mate with one or more females and then die, although some may live for several months. Females die soon after depositing their eggs in protected habitats on the ground. The life cycle requires from as little as 2 months to more than 2 years, depending on the species.

The treatment for ticks has to be custom-made for each and every job. It is imperative that the technician perform a complete inspection of the interior of the residence as well as the exterior for the residence. This residence was treated for ticks a month prior, the customer stated that the other pest control company never removed bed linens or even moved the dog crate around. Inspection is incredibly important.

Lakeland woman critical after more than 1,000 wasp stings

Lakeland — Emily ‘Juanita’ Foshee, 81, is in critical condition after being stung more than 1,000 times by wasps in the backyard of her Lakeland home.

Her husband of 55 years, Clyde Foshee spends his days back and forth between his jewelry store and Lakeland Regional, where Juanita is in ICU.

“There wasn’t a place on her body except her feet that wasn’t covered, by insect bites. I mean not a place on her body, all in her mouth,” he said. “I know she was screaming when she was coming out of there.”

Foshee said his wife is in and out of consciousness and effects from the stings have affected her heart, lungs and kidneys.

“All this poison has damaged her heart, in fact she had a heart attack, the second night she was in there,” he said, “it’s affected her lungs, she’s got fluid in the lungs, the liver is damaged, her kidneys is not working hardly at all.”

Foshee said the yellow jackets came from an underground nest and attacked Juanita while she was in the backyard. He said he’s since tried to get rid of the nest.

“I had one that bite me when I went over there, and that night I couldn’t even sleep,” he said. “Can you imagine getting bit as many times?”

Foshee said he’s taking it one day at a time.

Northern Manhattan Subway Riders Say Rats Abound

Fulton Street in Manhattan, June 2010.Marcus Yam/The New York Times The rats are downtown, too: Fulton Street in Manhattan in June.

Rodents, the traditional scourge of New York City, are having a rough year. The rise of the bedbug seems to have rendered rats a has-been pest, a mere nuisance to be ignored rather than read about in countless alarmist trend articles. The bedbug is a breakout media star; the rat is, well, still a rat.

But there is one realm where the rodent still rules, where rats play the stars of an underground theater with a captive audience in the millions. Where else but the subway?

Earlier this year, the city’s Board of Health, in what was called the first study of its kind, discovered that half the subway lines in Lower Manhattan exhibited signs of mild or severe infestation. At the time, many New Yorkers expressed a surprising fondness for the creatures.  Now, a new, slightly less scientific survey has found a similar rat takeover of 20 stations in Upper Manhattan, based on the observations of thousands of riders who say there is a “severe” rodent problem in the underground.

The Have You Seen a Rat Today? campaign, sponsored by State Senator Bill Perkins, a Democrat of Harlem, collected responses from about 5,000 New Yorkers who filled out surveys distributed by the senator’s office.

Because this type of survey is self-selecting, and because there was no way to verify the responses, the results of Mr. Perkins’s study (also see below) ought to be taken with a grain of rat poison. But the findings do seem to match up anecdotally with many New Yorkers’ experiences.

Nearly 9 in 10 respondents said they saw rats on a daily or weekly basis in the subway, with a majority of sightings on the tracks. (Far fewer rats appeared to make their way onto benches or into the trains themselves.) Only 1 percent of the respondents said they “never see rats.”

All 20 stations in Mr. Perkins’s district, the 30th, were cited. The worst offenders: the big 125th Street express stop at Saint Nicholas Avenue; the 145th Street station on the A, B, C and D lines; and the 163rd Street station in Washington Heights. Strangely, the new 96th Street station at Broadway was also cited, although perhaps all the recent construction sent rodents scurrying of late.

The point of the survey, Mr. Perkins said, was to prompt officials to examine new methods of attacking the rodent problem. He also proposed a ban on eating in the subway, similar to no-food policies used on transit systems in Chicago and Washington.

“What we know for sure is the rats are not growing the food they are eating, nor are they shopping at Whole Foods or McDonald’s,” Mr. Perkins said in an interview. He noted that discarded food and litter are the primary culprits that attract rats to the mass transit system: “If you feed ’em, you breed ’em.”

Mr. Perkins mailed his survey results to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority on Oct. 21, and he urged the agency to step up its eradication efforts. The agency has laid off station cleaners this year and acknowledged over the summer that it may not have the budget to pursue a more advanced attack against rodents.

“I know this is a challenging time for transit and for the M.T.A.,” Mr. Perkins wrote in his letter. “But rodents in the subway jeopardize the health of all those who travel and work underground.”

In the interview, Mr. Perkins emphasized the far-reaching effects of his cause.

“This system is so important to people,” he said. “It is an experience that determines significantly one’s daily life, not simply from a bread-and-butter go-to-work point of view, but from an emotional and psychic point of view.

“You’re on a subway and a rat is sitting next to you — that moment does not end for a while.”


Bedbugs hitch at ride to Fresno for a bite

By Barbara Anderson / The Fresno Bee

Add Fresno to the list of cities under attack by bedbugs.

The bloodsucking pests have been a growing and highly visible problem in New York City for months — and now they’re here in force, pest-control operators say.

While the New York outbreak has struck hotels and public places, bedbugs in Fresno are mostly turning up in homes, pest-control operators say.

But the bugs can spread quickly, and there’s no way to know just how many there are. The Fresno County Department of Public Health doesn’t keep track of bedbug complaints like they do measles or mumps.

A bedbug is about the size of an apple seed when mature. The bugs feed on human blood, like ticks, and multiply quickly, hatching more than 12 eggs a week, Clay said. They can be clear, but after a blood meal, they can be reddish-brown, he said.

Flesh-eating ants bit elderly heart patient hundreds of times on legs and genitals as he lay in intensive care

An elderly man was bitten hundreds of times on his legs and genitals by a swarm of flesh-eating ants as he lay in his hospital bed.

Cornelius Lewis, 76, was in the intensive care unit at Gulf Coast Medical Center in Florida, recovering from an operation to fit a pacemaker the day before the ant attack.

Remarkably, because he was attacked beneath the bed sheets, medical staff didn’t even notice the ants were literally feasting on him until they pulled back the covers hours later.

Ant attack: A swarm of ants bit a heart patient hundreds of times (file picture)
Ant attack: A swarm of ants bit a heart patient hundreds of times (photograph © Alex Wild 2005)

Lewis remains at Gulf Coast Medical Center and is said to be in a serious condition, although that is related to his previous heart surgery, rather than the ant attack.

According to his son, Mr Lewis was bitten ‘a couple hundred’ times on his legs and genitals by Pavement Ants.

‘He was supposed to be monitored every 10 minutes,’ Neil Lewis told Florida website Newspress.com.

‘My mom was there, and they didn’t give her any information.

‘They said, “Let’s just get him out of the room.” And my father was so exhausted he didn’t have the ability to complain.’

After the attack, Mr Lewis said his father was moved to another room but that it, too, was infested with ants.

Lee Memorial Health System, which runs the hospital, says it is taking preventive steps at their hospitals to stop any repeat of the incident.

‘We have confirmed there were ants,’ said Karen Krieger, director of public relations at Lee Memorial Health System.

She added: ‘There were no reports of other patients being bitten by ants and Gulf Coast is the only hospital with an ant problem.’

The company’s other premises at Lee Memorial Hospital, Cape Coral Hospital and Health Park are now being treated by pest control experts.

The intensive care unit at Gulf Coast Medical Center has been evacuated, sprayed and treated and exterminators will check for the insects every three days.

Rooftops and exteriors are being sprayed weekly. This will continue until there is no ant sightings for 30 days.

It is understood the checks for ants previously took place on a monthly basis, which indicates the hospital knew it had a problem with the ants.

A pest control expert in Florida, a hot and sticky climate that is a perfect breeding ground for insects, told WINK News that Pavement Ants, which are the type believed to have bitten Lewis, don’t usually attack because they generally live outside.

‘Pavement ants are omnivores,’ said Allen Fugler Jr.

‘Every pest needs food, water and harborage. If lacking in one of those three, they will aggressively seek out a food source, water or a place to live.’

All-natural bedbug sprays have little bite

Products such as Rest Easy and Bed Bug Bully claim to be highly effective at controlling the insects, but researchers say there aren’t yet any consumer products proven to keep bedbugs away.

Bedbug

Bedbugs can be very hard to get rid of, and “all natural” remedies don’t show much promise. (University of Florida Institute of Food / October 25, 2010)

Bedbugs combine all of the bloodsucking annoyance of mosquitoes with the survival instinct of cockroaches. No bigger than apple seeds, the adult bugs hide in ingenious places — inside electrical outlets, behind baseboards, deep in carpet fibers — during the day and attack their victims during the night. You may never know that you have a bedbug problem until bites start showing up on your skin. Bedbugs don’t spread any illnesses, but still. Ick.

The bugs are tough, they’re devious and they’re gaining new ground in homes and hotel rooms across the country, says Susan Jones, an entomologist at Ohio State University in Columbus. “They are the worst insects that we’ve ever had to deal with in an urban environment.”

As worry about bedbugs grows, it’s no surprise that many people are taking pest control into their own hands. Do-it-yourself exterminators can choose from many different sprays that claim to kill the bugs and prevent infestations.

Some products, like Rest Easy Bed Bug Spray, are sold as all-natural alternatives to traditional pesticides. Rest Easy, manufactured by the RMB Group, contains essential oils from cinnamon and lemon grass, among other ingredients. Bed Bug Bully, produced by a company called My Cleaning Products, claims to be 100% natural. The company website doesn’t list any ingredients, but a sales manager reached by phone said that the spray ingredients include tea tree oil and lavender. The company didn’t respond to a request for more information.

A 16-ounce spray bottle of Rest Easy — sold at many Walgreens, Ace Hardware and other stores — costs about $16. The company website instructs users to spray Rest Easy on “dressers drawers, closets, along baseboards, behind headboards, and around any other furniture you want treated.” The site advises against spraying the bed directly. “If bed bugs are present in the bed,” the site says, “call a professional for extermination.”

A 32-ounce bottle of Bed Bug Bully, available at many drugstores, retails for about $50. A video tutorial on the company website encourages users to spray “wherever you think bedbugs may be.”

If you want a little more punch in your spray, you might consider buying a product that contains an EPA-registered pesticide. Steri-Fab, a spray from Noble Pine Products, contains alcohol with a small amount of d-phenothrin, a common pesticide often found in flea and tick products. It’s sold online — Amazon is one option — and at many professional cleaning supply outlets. On Amazon.com, a 1-gallon bottle sells for a little more than $40. According to the company site, a gallon is enough to cover eight to 10 pieces of upholstered furniture or six to seven mattress sets.

The claims

The Rest Easy website says that its “optimized blend of natural ingredients has been universally recognized for thousands of years as a means for controlling insects.” In a phone interview, company President Howard Brenner said, “We are all-natural and highly effective.” He also said that people who have a serious and obvious infestation should call an exterminator. “Our product is for people who think they might have bedbugs or are paranoid that they might get them.”

The Bed Bug Bully site says the product is “by far the best bed bug treatment you can get on the market today.” It also promises “the same results delivered by pest service without evacuation.”

The Steri-Fab website says that, “unlike any other product available in the U.S. and the world,” Steri-Fab kills bedbugs, fleas, ticks and lice along with bacteria and viruses. The site also says it “dries in 15-20 minutes and leaves no residue.” The FAQ section explains that the product kills bugs on contact but becomes essentially inactive once it dries. In a phone interview, company Vice President Eric Bryan said his product “isn’t a panacea” but does have a proven ability to kill bugs. “Those all-natural botanical products” are baloney, he added.

The bottom line

Gail Getty, a research entomologist at UC Berkeley, says she’d love to see a day when people could quickly solve their bedbug problems on their own. “I want to encourage new research. It would be great if there was something that was safe and effective.”

Unfortunately, she says, no consumer products on the market today have been proved to completely remove bedbugs from the home. Because bedbugs are so adept at hiding, and because any bugs you can target with a spray are going to just be the tip of the infestation, it really takes a professional exterminator to get rid of the bugs, she says.

Jones, the Ohio State University entomologist, is especially leery of “all-natural” products. “If you think that using these sprays is going to get rid of your bedbugs, you are sorely mistaken.” Jones points out that pesticide-free products such as Bed Bug Bully or Rest Easy aren’t required by the Environmental Protection Agency to prove that they are actually effective against bugs — all that matters is that they are considered safe.

And while d-phenothrin, the pesticide in Steri-Fab, definitely has some killing power, Jones says many populations of bedbugs are developing a resistance to that chemical.

Jones adds that even professional exterminators armed with industrial-strength chemicals generally need several hours to clean out an infestation. “If somebody goes in and out in 15 minutes, you just wasted your money.”

Bed Bugs, Bed bugs, Bed Bugs, Bed Bugs, Bed bugs, Bed Bugs, Bed Bugs, Bed bugs, Bed Bugs, Bed Bugs, Bed bugs, Bed Bugs, Bed Bugs, Bed bugs, Bed Bugs, Bed Bugs, Bed bugs, Bed Bugs, Bed Bugs, Bed bugs, Bed Bugs, Bed Bugs, Bed bugs, Bed Bugs, Bed Bugs, Bed bugs, Bed Bugs,Bed Bugs, Bed bugs, Bed Bugs,……Are you as tired of hearing about Bed Bugs as I am?

The truth of the matter is that those nasty blood sucking devils are here and getting worse. Good public awareness to their habits, signs of infestation and treatment is one of the best tools to getting some control of those guys (and gals).

One thing that you can do to keep safe from Bed Bug’s while traveling is to check the bed. Yep, check the entire bed and then some!

Before I even move anything into a room while travelling, I rip the sheets off, lift the mattress and check out everything from under the bed frame to the pillow cases. Does that seem extreme to you? On a recent trip to North Carolina, we stopped at three motels. Two of those motels had bed bugs, one of which was totally infested.    Check your rooms thoroughly!

BTW do not use a black light! You discover more problems with the room than bed bugs…..as seen below.

And since we are the subject of travelling stop over horro stories…lets keep going  and check out a few more.

ok, this is alittle different, lol.